Chicks with Guns – Seeing RED

February 9th, 2015

Photo Assignment: Chicks with Guns

Seeing RED

 

You don’t kill animals. You harvest them

You don’t kill animals. You harvest them

 You don’t kill animals. You harvest them.

Not The Obvious Choice: If you think about it, I’m a very odd choice to shoot a project like this. I didn’t speak the language of outdoor sports, especially hunting! In my experience, affinity matters. For instance, I was once up for a commercial account for a golf accessory business. I didn’t get the account simply because I didn’t golf. Everyone that worked on that account had to be a golfer. In retrospect, that made a lot of sense. How could I possibly add anything to a golf shoot if I didn’t know the first thing about golf?

Now we come to “Chicks with Guns” : I’ve never hunted and have only fished on occasion. I’ve always lived in the city. Truthfully, I’ve never really understood why people liked hunting. It seemed barbaric to me. And based on where and how I was raised, it made sense for me to think that way.

They’re not guns. They’re firearms.

They’re not guns. They’re firearms.

They’re not guns. They’re firearms.

A Different Kind of “Shoot”: I fancy myself a wannabe video producer. Since the middle of last summer, I had been traveling to Maine every weekend, working on a peripherally related spec video project to flex my producer skills. When a client asked me to shoot a calendar for The Maine Sportsman Magazine, I didn’t hesitate! I thought, at the very least, the project would subsidize my gas expenses.

I also knew this type of project is why I got into the business of being a photographer in the first place. I wanted experiences that were both outside my sphere of knowledge and/or outside my comfort zone. And besides, this was the Miss Main Sportsman Competition—“Chicks with Guns”! What could be wrong with a photo-essay like that? Little did I know I was in for the learning experience of my life!

Jodi Jennings Haskell - Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

Jodi Jennings Haskell – Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

 

I’m A Liberal from Connecticut:  “Hi! I’m Steve Marsel. I’m a liberal from Connecticut, and I’ve never fired a rifle.” Though I never actually said that, those words rang in my head during each call I had with the finalists of the Miss Maine Sportsman Competition to introduce myself for an upcoming shoot. Their way of life was alien to me: hunting, fishing, stuffing. Words not found in my daily vocabulary. But when I opened my mind and put my preconceived notions to rest, what I discovered about these “alien” people taught me a great deal about myself and my world view.

Britt Humphrey - Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

Britt Humphrey – Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

 

Ballots, Businesses, Bears, Oh My!: This project came at a critical time in the state of Maine. A binding question on the November ballot might have banned the use of bait, dogs or traps to hunt bears in the State of Maine – forever! Animal-rights groups had been streaming in money from out of state for months. The “bear-baiting” question was on everyone’s mind.

Carly Chapman  - Finalist 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

Carly Chapman – Finalist 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

I discovered that thousands of people made their living in Maine as registered guides. For those of you who don’t know, a registered guide is “any person who receives any form of remuneration for his services in accompanying or assisting any person in the fields, forests or on the waters or ice within the jurisdiction.” There are more than 4,500 registered guides for hunting and fishing in the state. More people than I ever imagined.

Tiffany Waldron - Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

Tiffany Waldron – Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

 

Against the Odds:  Old school hunters were dying off, and sporting camps and lodges found it difficult to make ends meet in the modern world. For one, the competition for American sporting activities is staggering, leaving hunting and fishing desperate to keep up. For another, gas prices (until recently) had been increasing over the past few years, which really put a crimp in many businesses. It became harder and harder for sporting camps to remain viable businesses. So many of their customers drive from other states.

Georgette Kanach - Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

Georgette Kanach – Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

 

What the average person doesn’t understand about the hunting industry is how many people travel from out of state to hunt and, more importantly, the economic stimulus their travels provide. Hunters and fishermen that drive up from other states usually stop along the way at the Kittery Trading Post or L.L. Bean or the like and spend money. Of course, many of those hunters come for the bear hunt.

Barbara Plummer - Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

Barbara Plummer – Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

 

A registered guide told me that even prior to election day, when the referendum would finally come to a vote, hunters, who would normally leave there trophy bears with taxidermists in Maine, were taking their bears back with them to their home states. “Why?” I asked him. He explained that the out-of-state hunters didn’t know if they would ever come back to Maine. Even before the first ballot was cast, the state was losing money.

Linda Mercer - Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

Linda Mercer – Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

 

Both Sides of the Coin: Then there’s the larger issue, which is the really big educational concern for me. Most Americans have no idea where their food comes from, and many just don’t care. They think it’s cruel that hunters bait bears in the woods and shoot them. Perhaps these people think that their meat appears out of thin air on a piece of Styrofoam wrapped in plastic. “Blue-state” Americans (seemingly) refuse to make the connection with the food they eat in restaurants or put on their tables and where the food actually comes from. And I must admit that I was one of those liberal blue-state people. I thought that hunting was cruel.

Bethany Terstegen - Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

Bethany Terstegen – Finalists 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

 

Let me make something clear: the bears in the woods have a much better chance of surviving than any animal waiting to be killed in a slaughterhouse somewhere, such as farm-bred cattle or chickens. The animals we line up in narrow stalls without giving an inch to turn their neck—they stand no chance of surviving! I think that my liberal brethren never think of that. The reason they don’t think of it is because they don’t want to.

Alyson Randall - Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

Alyson Randall – Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

 

Hunting and fishing in America is a birthright. It’s how this country was settled. And it is narrow and shortsighted to think hunting and fishing as simply cruel and unusual punishments. Especially when you consider the slaughterhouses and huge corporate farms that treat animals cruelly as a matter of course day-in and day-out. Where is the uproar for the rights of those animals? No one seems to care.

 

Starley Cashman - Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

Starley Cashman – Finalist, 2014 Miss Maine Sportsman Competition

 

A Look from the Other Side: You’ve probably heard the old saying, “A mind is like an umbrella: it functions best when open.” (Lincoln) That’s how I hope to approach every experience in my life. I want to keep an open mind so that I see both sides of as many issues as possible. True, I am a liberal, from a blue state, but the past few months have educated me. I now better understand where guides, hunters, fisherman and the like are coming from. I force myself to rise above the hypocrisy.

Now, that doesn’t mean I’m going to pick up a rifle and start hunting tomorrow or next year or possibly ever. I’m not sure hunting is for me. But I learned something. I learned that I didn’t understand the issue of harvesting animals from the point of view of the people that were using them. My new friends gave me a new-found appreciation for what those individuals are fighting. I’m glad to engage anyone on this topic and speak on both sides of it. But I think that after this exposure, I’ve been informed and transformed. “Chicks with guns” turned out to be a very educational project for me, and I appreciate the opportunity to have experienced it.

 

 A very special thanks to James Eves for his generous spirit and gifted skills retouching these images.  Thank you my friend!

And to  Rhen Wilson for his superb editing skills.

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Our Bravest: A Salute to Veterans

November 11th, 2014

 My Photo Session with Disabled Veterans from Our Bravest

Our Bravest Composite FullBehind the camera, my own assumptions and comfort zone can be rattled. In honor of Veterans Day, I offer this story about one of those occasions.

 

An Unusual Pitch

The project started out as so many do—a pitch over the phone. In early spring of this year, a long-time client, Theresa Fisher of CCA Global in Manchester NH (whom I really like!), rang me up and ran through the typical pitch I’d heard a least a dozen times. But my ears perked when she mentioned a “public service project.” I’ve made a point over the years to seek out public service projects, but my migration from still photography to television has spread me a little thin.

I was already primed to agree when the client sweetened the deal with a few more details. I can’t recall the entire conversation—my ADD/multi-tasking brain can only absorb so much—but a few choice phrases stuck out:

“—Fourth of July weekend—”  “—see the fireworks—” “—in New York City—”  “—put you up in a hotel—”

Theresa knew exactly how to whet my appetite. What self-respecting photographer wouldn’t say yes to this?

However, it was only after an emphatic “YES!” that I came to terms with what I had just agreed to. The realization hit me square in the face. I’d signed on to shoot portraits for an organization called Our Bravest, a non-profit that builds Smart Homes for catastrophically injured veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. In other words, the types of veterans Our Bravest works with include burn victims and double and triple amputees.  I had never heard of Our Bravest.

As I set the phone down, my heart sank.

Exposing My Discomfort

You might be asking why the sinking heart. What was my issue? To be honest, lack of exposure. I’m not from a military family. No contemporary of mine is or has been in the military. I’ve never even met anyone disabled.

My mind raced, envisioning the injuries, the scars, the missing limbs. I’m squeamish to boot. I’m the kind of person who switches channels and looks the other way whenever I see something upsetting. I can’t even get my blood drawn without averting my eyes.  So imagining the day of the shoot, meeting these veterans…it made me – uncomfortable – to say the least!

But what could I do? There was no way I could reject the client’s offer. Theresa (Senior Vice President,Visual Merchandising and Branding) has always been a great supporter of mine. I’d committed myself to the project, and that was that.

 

Shifting the Focus

On an early Saturday morning in New York City, the day of the shoot for Our Bravest, my assistant Alex Mateo and I set up a studio in a function room in the hotel. I brought Alex because he’d done a tour of duty in the Air Force, and I thought someone on my team should have something in common with today’s subjects from Our Bravest.

When the first man to be photographed appeared, he rolled into the room on a motorized wheelchair. My heart quickened, and my equipment felt heavy and slick in my sweaty palms.

When I’m anxious, I become super efficient. I try to control everything I can, while I can, knowing that at any moment, I could lose any semblance of control I tried to cling to.

As the veteran, a triple amputee, approached, I felt that control slipping away. I hardly knew what to say, but the veteran didn’t need an introduction. As if sensing my nervousness, he introduced himself with an apology. “Sorry I’m late,” he said, slapping the arm of his wheelchair playfully. “This thing only goes about eight miles per hour. So traffic was pretty tough to get through.”

Without warning, I burst out laughing. And so did he. It wasn’t even that funny of a joke, but that wasn’t the point. The point was this man, who had gone through so much, used humor to snap me out of myself.

I had been so caught up in my own uneasiness, I didn’t bother addressing the truth. America’s veterans are us. We’re all the same. I didn’t need Alex to share something in common with them to make the day run smoother. We all share similarities, be it art, family, or a little self-effacing humor.

Any discomfort I had entering the studio dissolved immediately. For the remainder of the shoot, good banter and wit united us, and my empathy for the men and women who sacrifice themselves for this country blossomed. The resilience of the human spirit transformed me, and, thankfully, I will never be the same.

 

Special thanks to Theresa Fisher at CCA Global, Frank Siller and Paola Tornabene at Our Bravest for this great opportunity, James Eves for his great retouching, and Alex Mateo for his steady support, and Rhen Wilson for his superb editing skills.  

 

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Ice Holes – Behind the Scenes

May 12th, 2014

ICE HOLES 

Behind The Scenes

Photographs taken behind the scenes of the National Geographic TV Series “ICE HOLES”

Photographs taken behind the scenes of the National Geographic TV Series “ICE HOLES”

 

Behind The Scenes

Show-Runner Mark Therrien takes a quick snapshot during the first week of shooting “ICE HOLES”  in Meredith New Hampshire.   It’s unusual weather for January and that fact is not lost on the crew.  This “behind the scenes” blog will try to shed light, demystify, and mostly entertain the viewers.  It’s also an opportunity to explain process through pictures and words of the cast and crew.  Over the next few months I’ll ask all members of the cast and many members of the crew for their comments and stories.  Ice fishing is an obsession for a tight-knit group of colorful fishermen, as they compete against Mother Nature, and each other, in hopes of catching the big one. The group arrives at Lake Winnipesaukee, N.H., for their first ice fishing derby of the season, the King of the Lake Derby. With $600 on the line for the biggest catches, it is a mad dash to claim the best hunting grounds.

 

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Don Zimmer: “One Hell of a Life”

November 20th, 2014

I‘m sure there are not many baseball fans who follow the meandering career of a lifetime .235 hitter, but I’ve followed Don Zimmer since I was a boy growing up in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn – home to the Brooklyn Dodgers – in the 1950s.

Zimmer was hardly an All-Star. Maybe it was his sporty name, perhaps better suited to a heat-throwing pitcher than a utility infielder. But mostly it was his perseverance in the face of so many obstacles. Zimmer was a throwback. A baseball lifer, thoroughly old-school in the best sense of that phrase, his baseball career spanned 65 years – a lifetime for many of us – suiting up as a player, coach, and manager. He played for five MLB teams – the Dodgers (both Brooklyn and L.A.), Cubs, Reds, Mets, and Washington. He even played in Japan, Cuba, and Puerto Rico

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

He started at 2B for the Dodgers in game 7 of the 1955 World Series, the first and only championship the Brooklyn Dodgers would ever win. As a nine-year-old, I can still remember the celebration that filled the streets of Brooklyn when we had at long last toppled the Yankees from their pinnacle of success. Zimmer later joked that he helped win that World Series when Dodgers’ manager Walter Alston removed him from the game in a defensive switch that placed Sandy Amoros in LF. Amoros would make a dramatic game-saving catch that resulted in an inning-ending double play. Zimmer noted that if he had been a better player, Alston wouldn’t have taken him out, and the Dodgers lose another World Series.

After signing with Brooklyn at age 18 in 1949, Zimmer’s career nearly ended before it began when he was struck in the head by a fastball thrown by Jim Kirk during a minor league game in 1953. Zimmer collapsed. The pitch had fractured his skull, causing blood clots to form in his brain. Surgery was required to save his life. When he woke up in a hospital bed six days later, he was “seeing triple” and couldn’t speak. The surgeons drilled four holes in his skull to relieve the pressure. He was told he would never play baseball again. The Dodgers had promised him a job in their organization, but Zimmer was determined to take to the field again, and the following year he was playing at Ebbets Field.

As he would recall in his 2001 autobiography, “Zim: A Baseball Life” (the first of two books written with sports columnist Bill Madden), the word at the time was that a metal plate had been inserted in his skull, and for years he endured both the good-natured and disparaging ribbing from players and fans as to the effects of that metal plate on his mental acuity. But, as Zimmer recounted, those holes in his skull were actually filled with metallic plugs, adding – with characteristic self-deprecating humor – “all those players who played for me through the years and thought I sometimes managed like I had a hole in my head were wrong. I actually have four holes in my head!”

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

That beaning incident would lead to the MLB recommending batting helmets for players. Zimmer was beaned again in 1956, breaking his cheekbone and permanently damaging his vision. Appropriately enough, he’s shown on the cover of his autobiography wearing a soldier’s battle helmet. He was given the helmet following another injury while Joe Torre’s bench coach with the Yankees during a 1999 playoff game. Sitting next to Torre in the Yankees dugout, he was struck by a foul ball off the bat of Chuck Knoblauch. The next day he was presented with the helmet with the name “Zim” and the Yankees logo stenciled on it. Following that incident, the Yankees would later install a short protective fence in front of the dugout, now standard practice in all major league parks.

There are no highlight reels from Zimmer’s playing career, as befits a career .235 hitter and utility infielder, although he was named to the All-Star team with the Chicago Cubs in 1961, the year that baseball first expanded. The next year, Zimmer would find himself playing 3B for the Mets inaugural season. As bad as that team was (leading its manager Casey Stengel to memorably ask, “Can’t anyone here play this game?”), Zimmer was worse, batting .077 in all of 14 games before being shipped off to Cincinnati, where his playing career would finally grind to a halt a year later. He is best remembered today as a manager, notably with the Cubs and Red Sox, and as Joe Torre’s bench coach with the Yankees from 1996 until he resigned, exasperated with Yankees’ owner, George Steinbrenner, his one-time close friend, in 2003.

His time in Boston, both as a 3B coach and manager in the 1970s and early ‘80s, was not without incident. By that time my baseball allegiance had long since departed Brooklyn and settled in Boston, and Zimmer was once again one of my guys. He was the manager during the Red Sox late season collapse in 1978 when they were overtaken by the Yankees before losing a memorable one-game playoff on Bucky “F.” Dent’s HR off of Mike Torrez. Zimmer’s relationship with certain players, notably Bill Lee and Ferguson Jenkins, deteriorated. It was Lee who referred to Zimmer as “the Gerbil,” a name that stuck in Boston to this day. But Zimmer shook off criticism – he had been through worse – and was always quick to defend his players. That spirit was exemplified in an on-field fracas between the Yankees and the Red Sox players in a 2003 playoff game at Fenway. Zimmer, at age 72, charged onto the field and made a beeline toward Red Sox pitcher, Pedro Martinez, who pushed Zimmer aside and to the ground. Zimmer would later apologize for what he described as his embarrassing behavior, but his players and Yankees fans saw it as one more manifestation of Zimmer’s feistiness.

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

In his autobiography, Zimmer states that the most gratifying accomplishment of his career was managing the Chicago Cubs to first place in the NL East and a rare playoff appearance in 1989, when they had been forecast to finish low in the standings. He was honored by being named the NL Manager of the Year, the only MLB award he received in his career.

As NY Times columnist, Tyler Kepner, noted after Zimmer’s death in June of this year, Zimmer’s life was so centered around baseball that he married his high school sweet-heart (they would remain married for 63 years) at home plate at a minor league ballpark in 1951.

Zimmer played during the era before free agency, when salaries were appalling low by today’s standards. He earned only $17,000 playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers’ World Series championship team in 1959. Yet he wrote in his autobiography that he was proud to say that he never earned a dime outside of baseball in his entire life until he cashed his first retirement check.

For me, Don Zimmer is one of those few ballplayers who connects me back to my youth and whose career, in its many manifestations, tracks my own lifetime love affair with the game of baseball. In an era of saber-metrics and laptop computers, Zimmer would be the odd-man out today. He relied more upon instinct and his first-hand knowledge of the game. The ballpark, any ballpark, was his true home. As Joe Torre would write of his “adviser and friend” following Zimmer’s death, “the ballpark was his tabernacle. He never felt quite comfortable anywhere else, except for at home or at the track.” Torre was right, of course, but for me, Zimmer penned the perfect epitaph when he wrote: “For a lifetime .235 hitter, I’ve had one hell of a life.”

 

Guest Blogger Joe Carr

Guest Blogger Joe Carr

 

Joe Carr is a writer and development communications consultant to non-profits. A New Yorker by birth, Joe converted, becoming a diehard Boston Red Sox fan after moving to Boston and working at MIT and Harvard. Joe makes the pilgrimage from his home in Peekskill, NY, to Fenway several times a year. A life-long baseball fan, Joe (like Zimmer himself) feels most at home at baseball parks, and at the track!

 

 

 

 

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ICE HOLES – Alex Sledding

June 29th, 2014

ICE HOLES

Alex Sledding

On Location with ICE HOLES Series Creator Steve Marsel

Alex Plummer & Wade Bigelow on the Sled

Alex Plummer & Wade Bigelow on the Sled

Alex Plummer & Wade Bigelow on the Sled

Shot on Lake Winnipesaukee, New Hampshire.

This photograph taken on location on the set of National Geographic Channel’s ICE HOLES by Series Creator & Executive Producer Steve Marsel  Saturday, February 8th, 2014 on Lake Winnipesaukee in Meredith, New Hampshire.   This was taken during the filming of Episode 104- “Party on Ice”. Alex Plummer is a difficult person to get to hold still long enough to take a picture.  He’s hyper, both in actions and words.  He’s like a kinetic energy machine, always doing something.  Sometimes even fishing!     Alex has a big spirit and is a kind soul, open and unguarded! .  A self-admitted “hugger”, he is welcoming and kind to strangers, which is a huge aspect of his personal appeal.  Then of course, there’s the wild side of the person whom is referred to by his friends as “AP”.  I’ve never seen Alex let anything get in the way of a good time – ever!  For Alex, downtime is just a breath in-between adventures!  He plays hard and doesn’t take any of it too seriously.  His attitude is perfect for his age and place in life.  He’s refreshing and has been a pleasure to work with since the day we met!  – The show airs Fridays on National Geographic Channel. For more of Steve Marsel’s Photography, please visit Steve Marsel Studio

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Steve Marsel~Cinemagraph of Poles

June 29th, 2014

Steve Marsel’s Cinemagraphs

 

Adding Motion and Interest!

On Location with Photographer Steve Marsel

Steve Marsel's Cimemagraph of Brunswick School's Ogden family

Steve Marsel’s Cimemagraph of Brunswick School’s Ogden family

Brunswick School’s Odgen Family – Giving back and Conservation

Pictured above is one of Steve Marsel’s eight Cinemagraphs taken for [addlink url=”http://www.brunswickschool.org/” text=”The Brunswick School”] in Greenwich, Connecticut.  Brunswick is the leading independent day school for boys, nationally recognized for the strength of their academics, athletics, and the arts.  The school is known for the clarity and consistency of their educational mission, and the quality and character of our students, faculty, and alumni.  The Campaign for Brunswick seeks $100 million in capital gifts further these ideals and goals.  For the web aspect of the campaign, Steve Marsel was asked to create a series of images that grabbed the attention of the viewers of the site, preferably something they had never seen before!  In this Cinemagraph, the Ogden family is pictured on the breakwater at Greenwich Point not far from Brunswick Upper School campus.  The Family made a substantial donations to the school and are longtime supporters of The Connecticut Chapter of The American Red Cross where Ross Ogden spent six years on it’s board of governors.  Ross Ogden ’62 first came to Brunswick as a second grader in 1951, when his family moved to Greenwich from Chicago. He and his wife, Cathy, have two sons, both Brunswick “lifers.“ Ross ’91 obtained degrees from Dickinson College and The George Washington University, and currently invests in commercial real estate. He also follows his love of the outdoors with conservation work for various non-profit organizations. Ted ’95 was inspired by his years at Brunswick to pursue a teaching career after graduating from Middlebury College and earning an M.A. from the University of Chicago. He now teaches and coaches at the Landon School, outside of Washington, D.C. Like his brother, Ted is an avid fly-fisherman. Steve Marsel felt that the repeating loops of the tugging on the fishing pole made perfect sense for this image and complimented one of the passions of this family – conservation.

 

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ICE HOLES – Two Wise Men?

June 28th, 2014

ICE HOLES 

Two Wise Men?

On Location with ICE HOLES Series Creator Steve Marsel

ICE HOLES - Two Wise Men?

ICE HOLES – Two Wise Men?

 

This photograph taken on location on the set of National Geographic Channel’s ICE HOLES by Series Creator & Executive Producer Steve Marsel  Saturday, February 8th, 2014 on Lake Winnipesaukee in Meredith, New Hampshire.   This was taken during the filming of Episode 104- “Party on Ice”. In a scene that is reminiscent of a Christmas Eve creche, Alex Plummer & Wade Bigelow prepare to set off a home-made cannon in celebration of the annual Meredith Rotary Derby.  This is the dead of the winter, so it was probably not quite 7:00pm, but the scene was quite comical to me when I saw it, and still is!  I really love the late day light in winter.  It makes ordinary scenes into memorable images.  Glad I hung around to watch! ICE HOLES airs Fridays on National Geographic Channel. For more of Steve Marsel’s Photography, please visit Steve Marsel Studio

 

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Steve Marsel~Cinemagraph of Lights

June 28th, 2014

Steve Marsel’s Cinemagraphs

Adding Motion and Interest!

A Look Behind the Scenes with Photographer Steve Marsel

Brunswick School’s Baker Theater

Steve Marsel's Cinemagraph of the Brunswick School's Doyle Family

Steve Marsel’s Cinemagraph of the Brunswick School’s Doyle Family

Pictured above is one of Steve Marsel’s eight Cinemagraphs taken for [addlink url=”http://www.brunswickschool.org/” text=”The Brunswick School”] in Greenwich, Connecticut.  Brunswick is the leading independent day school for boys, nationally recognized for the strength of their academics, athletics, and the arts.  The school is known for the clarity and consistency of their educational mission, and the quality and character of our students, faculty, and alumni.  The Campaign for Brunswick seeks $100 million in capital gifts further these ideals and goals.  For the web aspect of the campaign, I was asked to create a series of images that grabbed the attention of the viewers of the site, preferably something they had never seen before!  Although the current version of animated gifs had been out for some time, they had no really caught-on, with one glaring exception – the on-line porn industry! If you think about it, Cinemagraphs and porn are a perfect match.  The device that separates a great Cinemagraph from all the others is a seamless repeating loop.  Some moving element that repeats itself in a “loop”.  So much of what that industry sells involves shots “loops” of motion that repeat themselves over and over again.  Once again – porn & Cinemagraphs are a great fit!  My challenge with the Brunswick School job was to come up with “repeating loops” that somehow related to the people in the photo and their connection to the school.  In this Cinemagraph, the Doyle family is pictured on the stage of the baker Theater on the Brunswick Upper School campus.  The Family made a substantial donation to the school earmarked for construction of the theater.  The houselights at the Baker Theater are programmable LED ceiling lights manufactured by [addlink url=”http://www.colorkinetics.com/showcase/theatre-entertainment/” text=”Philips Color Kinetics”]. The repeating loops of the lights made perfect sense and adds commentary to the image

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ICE HOLES – Kahtoola to the Rescue

June 26th, 2014

ICE HOLES

 

 Kahtoola to the Rescue

MICROspikes!!

On Location with ICE HOLES Series Creator Steve Marsel

This photograph taken on location on the set during the filming of ICE HOLES Episode 102 – “Now We’re Cookin” by Series Creator & Executive Producer Steve Marsel.  It was taken on  Sunday, January 19th, 2014 on Lake Winnipesaukee in Meredith New Hampshire. Day 3 of shooting was my first day on-set .  It was a strange weather day. 51F with a warm misting rain was not the weather one typically associates with January or ice fishing.  It was miserable for the crew and was creating havoc for the equipment.  Not to mention that there was virtually no traction for the crew or cast!  Noise Boys Production Audio Recordest MacAulay Flynt had already taken a hard fall by the time I arrived on Lake Winnipesaukee.  I however was not having this problem! That night I wrote an email to Danny Giovale, the President & CEO of [addlink url=”http://www.http://kahtoola.com/” text=”Kahtoola”].  They make what are called [addlink url=”http://kahtoola.com/product/microspikes” text=”MICROspikes”].  They are like the crampons that are used for scaling glaciers, but easier to get on and off!  I wrote in-part:

“We are at the very beginning of an 8-week shoot that will bring is to some of the most popular ice fishing derbies in North America including the Brainerd Jaycees ICE FISHING EXTRAVAGANZA, the largest in North America!  (See attached press release)  I wondering if you view this as an is an opportunity to show tens of thousands of ice fishing enthusiasts all over North America and potentially millions of viewers of the series how the pros negotiate the perils of walking on ice.  I am writing to ask you for MICROspikes for our entire crew and cast to be worn throughout the shoot.  I’m hoping you can see the benefits.”

ICE HOLES Show Runner  sporting a pair of Kahtoola’s MICROspikes®

ICE HOLES Show-runner Mark Therrien sporting a pair of Kahtoola’s MICROspikes®

Mr Giovale came through with MICROspikes for our entire cast & crew!  Many many thanks to you Danny.  MICROspikes were just what the crew needed !

ICE HOLES - Kahtoola to the Rescue

ICE HOLES – Kahtoola to the Rescue

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Steve Marsel Studio . 561 Windsor Street A204, Somerville MA 02143 617.718.7407 | 888.254.6505
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ICE HOLES – Alex Trapped!

June 26th, 2014

ICE HOLES

On Location with ICE HOLES Series Creator Steve Marsel

Alex Plummer “trapped”!

ICE HOLES - Alex Plummer "trapped"!

ICE HOLES – Alex Plummer “trapped”!

Shot on Lake Winnipesaukee, New Hampshire.

This photograph taken on location on the set of National Geographic Channel’s ICE HOLES by Series Creator & Executive Producer Steve Marsel  Saturday, February 8th, 2014 on Lake Winnipesaukee in Meredith, New Hampshire.   This was taken during the filming of Episode 104- “Party on Ice”. Alex Plummer is a difficult person to get to hold still long enough to take a picture.  He’s hyper, both in actions and words.  He’s like a kinetic energy machine, always doing something.  Sometimes even fishing!     Alex has a big spirit and is a kind soul, open and unguarded! .  A self-admitted “hugger”, he is welcoming and kind to strangers, which is a huge aspect of his personal appeal.  Then of course, there’s the wild side of the person whom is referred to by his friends as “AP”.  I’ve never seen Alex let anything get in the way of a good time – ever!  For Alex, downtime is just a breath in-between adventures!  He plays hard and doesn’t take any of it too seriously.  His attitude is perfect for his age and place in life.  He’s refreshing and has been a pleasure to work with since the day we met!  – The show airs Fridays on National Geographic Channel. For more of Steve Marsel’s Photography, please visit Steve Marsel Studio

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ICE HOLES – Donk- On The Fly!

June 23rd, 2014

ICE HOLES 

Ice Holes – Donk- On The Fly!

ICE HOLES- Donk On-The-Fly Interview

ICE HOLES- Donk On-The-Fly Interview

Donk- On The Fly!

 

This photograph taken on location on the set of National Geographic Channel’s ICE HOLES by Series Creator & Executive Producer Steve Marsel  Sunday, January 19th, 2014 on Lake Winnipesaukee in Meredith New Hampshire.  This was taken during the filming of ICE HOLES Episode 102 – “Now We’re Cookin” This is an example of an “OTF Interview”.  OTF stands for “on the fly,” and it’s a type of interview that is done on the spur of the moment with little or no planning.   They are generally emotion based, and you needn’t bother to ask for point-to-point setup information in an OTF situation  An OTF interview is used when something dramatic has just happened, but the dust has pretty much settled.  The director (Mark Therrien) doesn’t interrupt characters that are still talking to each other about a dramatic event, rather wait for them to finish when they are alone.  If the character is doing something and you want them to explain their actions while they are doing it, particularly if their action is the subject of the episode.  It’s a chance to have them explain to you what they are doing and why.   ICE HOLES airs Fridays on National Geographic Channel. For more of Steve Marsel’s Photography, please visit Steve Marsel Studio

 

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All Images on this site are copyrighted material of © Steve Marsel Studio, Inc. & Steve Marsel Studio LLC D/B/A Steve Marsel Studio. Unauthorized Use is Strictly Prohibited. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Steve Marsel Studio . 561 Windsor Street A204, Somerville MA 02143 617.718.7407 | 888.254.6505
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