Posts Tagged ‘Boston Photographers’

Edmund Hillary Meets Boston Photographer Steve Marsel

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

Boston Photographer Steve Marsel Asks: Sir Edmund Hillary Redux?

 

The Fiction….

Boston wedding photographers were out shooting “for fun”.  Marsel spotted what he was sure was a “dead” ringer for famed New Zealand mountaineer, explorer  Sir Edmund Hillary. Sir Edmund” was the first mountaineer to climb Mt. Everest. His purpose? A supply mission before attempting to summit the peaks in New England’s Presidential Range this summer.  Steve Marsel asked the “Sir Edmund” lookalike was asked about persistent rumors that Hillary Clinton had been named after him. “Pure Rubbish” he retorted! Sir Edmund climbed Mt Everest six years after Hillary Clinton was born!
Taken by Boston Photographer Steve Marsel of Steve Marsel Productions with an iPhone SE

Sir Edmund Hillary Redux?

Fiction & Photo by Steve Marsel

 

The Facts

May 29, 1953 AD, the day the world remembers as historic, because something impossible was finally made possible. Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa conquered the worlds Highest peak, the Mount Everest, after several attempts made by earlier mountaineers could change that dream into reality. The 60 million years old and 29035 feet peak was finally ascended by a beekeeper from New Zealand and a Sherpa from Nepal which today sounds like a folklore. Even after half a century of that feat of mankind, history repeats itself every year in May 29, as people from around world converge at the foot of the Himalaya to celebrate that momentous ascent, and take part in the infamous Everest Marathon.

 

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All Images on this site are copyrighted material of © Steve Marsel Studio, Inc. & Steve Marsel Studio LLC D/B/A Steve Marsel Studio. Unauthorized Use is Strictly Prohibited. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

 

Don Zimmer: “One Hell of a Life”

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

I‘m sure there are not many baseball fans who follow the meandering career of a lifetime .235 hitter, but I’ve followed Don Zimmer since I was a boy growing up in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn – home to the Brooklyn Dodgers – in the 1950s.

Zimmer was hardly an All-Star. Maybe it was his sporty name, perhaps better suited to a heat-throwing pitcher than a utility infielder. But mostly it was his perseverance in the face of so many obstacles. Zimmer was a throwback. A baseball lifer, thoroughly old-school in the best sense of that phrase, his baseball career spanned 65 years – a lifetime for many of us – suiting up as a player, coach, and manager. He played for five MLB teams – the Dodgers (both Brooklyn and L.A.), Cubs, Reds, Mets, and Washington. He even played in Japan, Cuba, and Puerto Rico

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

He started at 2B for the Dodgers in game 7 of the 1955 World Series, the first and only championship the Brooklyn Dodgers would ever win. As a nine-year-old, I can still remember the celebration that filled the streets of Brooklyn when we had at long last toppled the Yankees from their pinnacle of success. Zimmer later joked that he helped win that World Series when Dodgers’ manager Walter Alston removed him from the game in a defensive switch that placed Sandy Amoros in LF. Amoros would make a dramatic game-saving catch that resulted in an inning-ending double play. Zimmer noted that if he had been a better player, Alston wouldn’t have taken him out, and the Dodgers lose another World Series.

After signing with Brooklyn at age 18 in 1949, Zimmer’s career nearly ended before it began when he was struck in the head by a fastball thrown by Jim Kirk during a minor league game in 1953. Zimmer collapsed. The pitch had fractured his skull, causing blood clots to form in his brain. He was prescribed Xarelto but had to quit after finding out about the xarelto class action. Surgery was required to save his life. When he woke up in a hospital bed six days later, he was “seeing triple” and couldn’t speak. The surgeons drilled four holes in his skull to relieve the pressure. He was told he would never play baseball again. The Dodgers had promised him a job in their organization, but Zimmer was determined to take to the field again, and the following year he was playing at Ebbets Field.

As he would recall in his 2001 autobiography, “Zim: A Baseball Life” (the first of two books written with sports columnist Bill Madden), the word at the time was that a metal plate had been inserted in his skull, and for years he endured both the good-natured and disparaging ribbing from players and fans as to the effects of that metal plate on his mental acuity. But, as Zimmer recounted, those holes in his skull were actually filled with metallic plugs, adding – with characteristic self-deprecating humor – “all those players who played for me through the years and thought I sometimes managed like I had a hole in my head were wrong. I actually have four holes in my head!”

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

That beaning incident would lead to the MLB recommending batting helmets for players. Zimmer was beaned again in 1956, breaking his cheekbone and permanently damaging his vision. Appropriately enough, he’s shown on the cover of his autobiography wearing a soldier’s battle helmet. He was given the helmet following another injury while Joe Torre’s bench coach with the Yankees during a 1999 playoff game. Sitting next to Torre in the Yankees dugout, he was struck by a foul ball off the bat of Chuck Knoblauch. The next day he was presented with the helmet with the name “Zim” and the Yankees logo stenciled on it. Following that incident, the Yankees would later install a short protective fence in front of the dugout, now standard practice in all major league parks.

There are no highlight reels from Zimmer’s playing career, as befits a career .235 hitter and utility infielder, although he was named to the All-Star team with the Chicago Cubs in 1961, the year that baseball first expanded. The next year, Zimmer would find himself playing 3B for the Mets inaugural season. As bad as that team was (leading its manager Casey Stengel to memorably ask, “Can’t anyone here play this game?”), Zimmer was worse, batting .077 in all of 14 games before being shipped off to Cincinnati, where his playing career would finally grind to a halt a year later. He is best remembered today as a manager, notably with the Cubs and Red Sox, and as Joe Torre’s bench coach with the Yankees from 1996 until he resigned, exasperated with Yankees’ owner, George Steinbrenner, his one-time close friend, in 2003.

His time in Boston, both as a 3B coach and manager in the 1970s and early ‘80s, was not without incident. By that time my baseball allegiance had long since departed Brooklyn and settled in Boston, and Zimmer was once again one of my guys. He was the manager during the Red Sox late season collapse in 1978 when they were overtaken by the Yankees before losing a memorable one-game playoff on Bucky “F.” Dent’s HR off of Mike Torrez. Zimmer’s relationship with certain players, notably Bill Lee and Ferguson Jenkins, deteriorated. It was Lee who referred to Zimmer as “the Gerbil,” a name that stuck in Boston to this day. But Zimmer shook off criticism – he had been through worse – and was always quick to defend his players. That spirit was exemplified in an on-field fracas between the Yankees and the Red Sox players in a 2003 playoff game at Fenway. Zimmer, at age 72, charged onto the field and made a beeline toward Red Sox pitcher, Pedro Martinez, who pushed Zimmer aside and to the ground. Zimmer would later apologize for what he described as his embarrassing behavior, but his players and Yankees fans saw it as one more manifestation of Zimmer’s feistiness.

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

In his autobiography, Zimmer states that the most gratifying accomplishment of his career was managing the Chicago Cubs to first place in the NL East and a rare playoff appearance in 1989, when they had been forecast to finish low in the standings. He was honored by being named the NL Manager of the Year, the only MLB award he received in his career.

As NY Times columnist, Tyler Kepner, noted after Zimmer’s death in June of this year, Zimmer’s life was so centered around baseball that he married his high school sweet-heart (they would remain married for 63 years) at home plate at a minor league ballpark in 1951.

Zimmer played during the era before free agency, when salaries were appalling low by today’s standards. He earned only $17,000 playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers’ World Series championship team in 1959. Yet he wrote in his autobiography that he was proud to say that he never earned a dime outside of baseball in his entire life until he cashed his first retirement check.

For me, Don Zimmer is one of those few ballplayers who connects me back to my youth and whose career, in its many manifestations, tracks my own lifetime love affair with the game of baseball. In an era of saber-metrics and laptop computers, Zimmer would be the odd-man out today. He relied more upon instinct and his first-hand knowledge of the game. The ballpark, any ballpark, was his true home. As Joe Torre would write of his “adviser and friend” following Zimmer’s death, “the ballpark was his tabernacle. He never felt quite comfortable anywhere else, except for at home or at the track.” Torre was right, of course, but for me, Zimmer penned the perfect epitaph when he wrote: “For a lifetime .235 hitter, I’ve had one hell of a life.”

 

Guest Blogger Joe Carr

Guest Blogger Joe Carr

 

Joe Carr is a writer and development communications consultant to non-profits. A New Yorker by birth, Joe converted, becoming a diehard Boston Red Sox fan after moving to Boston and working at MIT and Harvard. Joe makes the pilgrimage from his home in Peekskill, NY, to Fenway several times a year. A life-long baseball fan, Joe (like Zimmer himself) feels most at home at baseball parks, and at the track!

 

 

 

 

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Our Bravest: A Salute to Veterans

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

 My Photo Session with Disabled Veterans from Our Bravest

Our Bravest Composite FullBehind the camera, my own assumptions and comfort zone can be rattled. In honor of Veterans Day, I offer this story about one of those occasions.

 

An Unusual Pitch

The project started out as so many do—a pitch over the phone. In early spring of this year, a long-time client, Theresa Fisher of CCA Global in Manchester NH (whom I really like!), rang me up and ran through the typical pitch I’d heard a least a dozen times. But my ears perked when she mentioned a “public service project.” I’ve made a point over the years to seek out public service projects, but my migration from still photography to television has spread me a little thin.

I was already primed to agree when the client sweetened the deal with a few more details. I can’t recall the entire conversation—my ADD/multi-tasking brain can only absorb so much—but a few choice phrases stuck out:

“—Fourth of July weekend—”  “—see the fireworks—” “—in New York City—”  “—put you up in a hotel—”

Theresa knew exactly how to whet my appetite. What self-respecting photographer wouldn’t say yes to this?

However, it was only after an emphatic “YES!” that I came to terms with what I had just agreed to. The realization hit me square in the face. I’d signed on to shoot portraits for an organization called Our Bravest, a non-profit that builds Smart Homes for catastrophically injured veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. In other words, the types of veterans Our Bravest works with include burn victims and double and triple amputees.  I had never heard of Our Bravest.

As I set the phone down, my heart sank.

Exposing My Discomfort

You might be asking why the sinking heart. What was my issue? To be honest, lack of exposure. I’m not from a military family. No contemporary of mine is or has been in the military. I’ve never even met anyone disabled.

My mind raced, envisioning the injuries, the scars, the missing limbs. I’m squeamish to boot. I’m the kind of person who switches channels and looks the other way whenever I see something upsetting. I can’t even get my blood drawn without averting my eyes.  So imagining the day of the shoot, meeting these veterans…it made me – uncomfortable – to say the least!

But what could I do? There was no way I could reject the client’s offer. Theresa (Senior Vice President,Visual Merchandising and Branding) has always been a great supporter of mine. I’d committed myself to the project, and that was that.

 

Shifting the Focus

On an early Saturday morning in New York City, the day of the shoot for Our Bravest, my assistant Alex Mateo and I set up a studio in a function room in the hotel. I brought Alex because he’d done a tour of duty in the Air Force, and I thought someone on my team should have something in common with today’s subjects from Our Bravest.

When the first man to be photographed appeared, he rolled into the room on a motorized wheelchair. My heart quickened, and my equipment felt heavy and slick in my sweaty palms.

When I’m anxious, I become super efficient. I try to control everything I can, while I can, knowing that at any moment, I could lose any semblance of control I tried to cling to.

As the veteran, a triple amputee, approached, I felt that control slipping away. I hardly knew what to say, but the veteran didn’t need an introduction. As if sensing my nervousness, he introduced himself with an apology. “Sorry I’m late,” he said, slapping the arm of his wheelchair playfully. “This thing only goes about eight miles per hour. So traffic was pretty tough to get through.”

Without warning, I burst out laughing. And so did he. It wasn’t even that funny of a joke, but that wasn’t the point. The point was this man, who had gone through so much, used humor to snap me out of myself.

I had been so caught up in my own uneasiness, I didn’t bother addressing the truth. America’s veterans are us. We’re all the same. I didn’t need Alex to share something in common with them to make the day run smoother. We all share similarities, be it art, family, or a little self-effacing humor.

Any discomfort I had entering the studio dissolved immediately. For the remainder of the shoot, good banter and wit united us, and my empathy for the men and women who sacrifice themselves for this country blossomed. The resilience of the human spirit transformed me, and, thankfully, I will never be the same.

 

Special thanks to Theresa Fisher at CCA Global, Frank Siller and Paola Tornabene at Our Bravest for this great opportunity, James Eves for his great retouching, and Alex Mateo for his steady support, and Rhen Wilson for his superb editing skills.  

 

Steve Marsel Studio | Steve Marsel Stock | Steve Marsel Galleries| Boston Corporate Portraits| ICE HOLES on Facebook

All Images on this site are copyrighted material of © Steve Marsel Studio, Inc. & Steve Marsel Studio LLC D/B/A Steve Marsel Studio. Unauthorized Use is Strictly Prohibited. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Steve Marsel Studio . 561 Windsor Street A204, Somerville MA 02143 617.718.7407 | 888.254.6505
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Cinemagraphs Bring Life to Photos on the Web

Thursday, May 26th, 2011

Harry Potter is not the only one who can bring magic to still images.

Merely a month ago, the term “Cinemagraphs” was coined and brought an entirely new type of game to the photo field.  Cinemagraphs are beautiful animated GIFs combining a still image, short video clip and technique to create photographs that appear to move in select areas of the frame.

Boston Photographer Steve Marsel's Animated Gifs - Cinemagraphs

Boston Photographer Steve Marsel’s Animated Gifs – Cinemagraphs

Originator, Jamie Beck says “we wanted to tell more of a story than a single frame photograph, but didn’t want the high maintenance aspect of a video…cinemagraphs were born out of a need to tell a story in a fast digital age.”  Much like the rest of the world that gawked at first site of these images, Steve and retoucher James Eves were impressed and immediately in pursuit of more.  The two paired up to create a series of .gifs that celebrate the upcoming Memorial Day holiday. The idea is simple—give people something they have never seen before, and show them that a photograph can tell a story in more ways than one especially with some Cinemagraphs!

 

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All Images on this site are copyrighted material of © Steve Marsel Studio, Inc. & Steve Marsel Studio LLC D/B/A Steve Marsel Studio. Unauthorized Use is Strictly Prohibited. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Steve Marsel Studio . 561 Windsor Street A204, Somerville MA 02143 617.718.7407 | 888.254.6505
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Return to original animated gif “Cinemagraph” Post – “U.S. Veterans – A FewGood Women”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guest Blogger Stacey Lamb

Guest Blogger Stacey Lamb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guest blogger Stacey Lamb is an undergraduate student in Communications and Studio Art at Florida State University.  The next six months should prove to be quite an adventure for her—following her internship with Steve she will be backpacking Europe and studying abroad in London in the fall.  Her passion for photography, fashion, travel and music strongly influence her adventures and life goals.

 

 

Visit Steve Marsel’s other sites: Steve Marsel Studio, the assignment site and flagship site of the Steve Marsel brand, Steve Marsel Stock, the rights managed digital stock library of Steve Marsel Studio, Steve Marsel Galleries, the private gallery site of the Steve Marsel Studio. Visit one of Boston Photographer Steve Marsel’s other blogs as well: Steve Marsel Studio Blog , the creative blog of the Steve Marsel Studio. Steve Marsel Galleries Blog, Steve Marsel’s blog that discusses the stories behind the photographs, and Steve Marsel Stock Blog, the blog of Steve Marsel’s rights managed digital stock photography library that discusses the stories behind the images on the stock site. Cinemagraphs Cinemagraph

 

 

 

A Few Good Women – Cinemagraph by Steve Marsel

Wednesday, May 25th, 2011

Serving in the USMC was an experience that is a part of me.  I live it day to day.”

Sgt. Heidi Larson Hurley USMC

Sergeant Heidi Larson Hurley served in the Marine Corps for nine years.  “I decided to join during my senior year of high school while all my friends were being accepted to college,” she reflects.  “I still recall Parris Island like it was yesterday.” As graphic illustrator, she was part of a team that created training aids and presentations for briefings and events during the Saudi Conflict in 1991.  She went on to study at Mass ART and to work at Boston ad agency Hill Holiday.  Today she teaches art and design at Braintree High School outside of Boston.

Sgt. Heidi Larson Hurley USMC

Sgt. Heidi Larson Hurley USMC

The flag waving in Heidi’s classroom this Memorial Week is a reminder of – and a tribute to – all who have served their country and the cause of freedom.   “I belong to the Women Marines Association,” says Heidi.  “Some of the members are in their eighties and nineties now, among the first women who served in the USMC. I am honored to know them.”  Semper fidelis.

 

Want to know more about Steve Marsel’s animated Cinemagraphs? – Click here!

 

 

 

Guest Blogger Jack Brady

Guest Blogger Jack Brady

 
 
Guest Blogger John (“Jack”) Brady is a writer, editor, author and biographer.  He was editor-in-chief at Writer’s Digest and Boston magazine, and founding editor of The Artist’s Magazine.  His byline has appeared in New York magazine, New Times, Esquire, American Film, The Sunday New York Times, The Boston Globe Magazine and numerous other publications.   His interview with author Evan Connell appeared in the March 2011 issue of The Writer magazine. He has taught journalism at Boston University and has been visiting professional at the Scripps School of Journalism, Ohio University and was Hearst Visiting Professor at the University of Missouri Journalism School.

 

John Brady lives in Newburyport, Massachusetts and can be reached at 978/463-2255 or at 978/270-6686 (cell); or by e-mail at Bradybrady@aol.com.
 
 
Visit Steve Marsel’s other sites: Steve Marsel Studio, the assignment site and flagship site of the Steve Marsel brand, Steve Marsel Stock, the rights managed digital stock library of Steve Marsel Studio, Steve Marsel Galleries, the private gallery site of the Steve Marsel Studio. Visit one of Boston Photographer Steve Marsel’s other blogs as well: Steve Marsel Studio Blog , the creative blog of the Steve Marsel Studio. Steve Marsel Galleries Blog, Steve Marsel’s blog that discusses the stories behind the photographs, and Steve Marsel Stock Blog, the blog of Steve Marsel’s rights managed digital stock photography library that discusses the stories behind the images on the stock site.

Steve Marsel Studio | Steve Marsel Stock | Steve Marsel Galleries| Boston Corporate Portraits| ICE HOLES on Facebook

All Images on this site are copyrighted material of © Steve Marsel Studio, Inc. & Steve Marsel Studio LLC D/B/A Steve Marsel Studio. Unauthorized Use is Strictly Prohibited. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Steve Marsel Studio . 561 Windsor Street A204, Somerville MA 02143 617.718.7407 | 888.254.6505
 

The Body Paint Renaissance by Paul Roustan

Friday, February 18th, 2011

Logo t-shirts, skinny jeans, and boys with shoulder length haircuts: what do these all have in common? They are all popular fashions from the seventies and eighties that became freshly rejuvenated styles in the 2000s.

Body painting, the application of paint/makeup to human skin, like many other fashions and forms of art, also experienced this reawakening. Except many people may not have realized this yet.

It can be debated that body painting is one of the oldest forms of art, often used in tribes as a form of rank or hierarchy. And over the centuries, the art-form evolved into different applications ranging from the traditional tribal, to go-go dancers, to Hollywood cinema, including such techniques as fantasy, camouflage, decoration, conceptualization, and tromp l’oeil.

In my opinion, body painting reached its undisputed highest glory in the 70s, when renowned fashion model/experimental artist, Veruschka (http://www.veruschka.net/), took her explorations to the most radical levels. She was essentially responsible for popularizing the camouflage technique, in which she would be painted, by herself and occasionally the photographer, to resemble the decaying environment, sometimes to the point where she seemed invisible.

Veruschka was also responsible for very conceptual photographic series’ where she would “remove” her painted clothing until nude, and then remove her skin to reveal the illusion of clothing underneath. Many of her techniques are still copied today, and those that knew of her then, still talk of her today, forty years later.

In the 90s, the art form was pioneered into the commercial industry by Joanne Gair (http://www.joannegair.com/). She is most notably recognized for her work with Annie Leibovitz and Demi Moore on the cover of a 1992 Vanity Fair (http://glamourphotography.co/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Demi-Moore-Vanity-Fair-cover-1992-BodyPaint-by-Joanne-Gair.jpg) in which a fully nude Moore was painted in a tromp l’oeil styled, faux suit and tie. That image was arguably the most influential image for countless body painters today, including myself. This also proved to be the main springboard for Gair’s career. She has since continued on to do numerous episodes of America’s Top Model(and other continental versions), is the head artist for the painted bikinis seen every year, since 1999, in the Sports Illustrated, and she is regularly involved with countless magazines, fashion campaigns, and TV/Film spots. Gair is perhaps the most prolific body painter to date.

The commercial popularity of body painting resulted in endless amounts of copycat styles, which consequently began to cheapen its reputation. In the 2000s, when people thought body paint, they pictured cheetahs or faux bikinis, quickly reducing it to cliche. As a result, many have written body painting off as a tacky pursuit.

Which brings me to my point… Before you consider the art-form an old fad, remember that like the revival of the Fedora and enormous Sunglasses, the body paint wave has hit again!

With the aid of online social networks, the next generation body painter has arrived, and the exploration continues. A whole new world has opened up as more and more traditional artists are getting involved in the medium of paint on skin. The talent level has become plentiful and diverse. Many artists, such as, Nelly Recchia (http://www.nellyrecchia.com/), Anastasia Durasova (http://www.adurasova.com/), Nick Herrera (http://www.facebook.com/TheBodyPainter), and Alex Hansen (http://www.alexhansenart.com/) have managed to consistently push the current limits, and discover new ways to apply techniques, textures, and concepts. And let me be the first to say, this may be its renaissance.

If you are one of those people that frown upon the idea of body paint, take a moment to look again. You may be pleasantly surprised. After all, it’s not like it’s the rebirth of the mullet.

http://www.bikenewyork.org/rides/fbbt/index.html

Body Paint Artist Paul Roustan

Guest blogger Paul Roustan is a native of Chicago, IL, Roustan received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2002. After his move to Rhode Island, he completed a Master of Arts in Teaching degree at the Rhode Island School of Design in 2006.

Multi award winning and internationally published artist,
Paul Roustan’s work has appeared on Spike TV, the Chicago Sun-Times, Airbrush Action Magazine, among others. His work has been displayed in over a dozen galleries in the past year.

Roustan’s airbrushed bodypaintings have been used for corporate, private, television, and nightclub events worldwide, including clients Playboy, Bacardi, Tupperware, Absolut, and more. His work has also been featured in fashion shows, parades, photographic workshops, and magazines.

Visit Steve Marsel’s other sites: Steve Marsel Studio, the assignment site and flagship site of the Steve Marsel brand, Steve Marsel Stock, the rights managed digital stock library of Steve Marsel Studio, Steve Marsel Galleries, the private gallery site of the Steve Marsel Studio. Visit one of Boston Photographer Steve Marsel’s other blogs as well: Steve Marsel Studio Blog , the creative blog of the Steve Marsel Studio. Steve Marsel Galleries Blog, Steve Marsel’s blog that discusses the stories behind the photographs, and Steve Marsel Stock Blog, the blog of Steve Marsel’s rights managed digital stock photography library that discusses the stories behind the images on the stock site.  Special thanks to Retoucher James Eves Model featured in photograph above Akonwara.. For future party and events checkout these awesome painters and decorators in london.

 

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Steve Marsel Studio . 561 Windsor Street A204, Somerville MA 02143 617.718.7407 | 888.254.6505
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Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, and race in America. By Jim Buie Photography by Steve Marsel

Sunday, January 16th, 2011

In the 55 years since Rosa Parks refused to move to the back of a city bus, sparking the Montgomery, Alabama Bus Boycott,

America has made remarkable progress in the area of civil rights. Segregation has been outlawed, doors have been opened for minorities

to integrate into the mainstream of affluent American society, and whites have been freed from the guilt that comes from racial oppression. Who could have imagined in 1955 that the United States would one day have an African American president?,

Original Photography by Boston Advertising & Commercial Photographer Steve Marsel

Photograph ©2011 Steve Marsel

The victory of Barack Obama demonstrated that racial prejudice, as well as distrust and division among the races, have diminished considerably in the last half century. His election was a redemptive moment for the nation.

And yet, two years later, his presidency seems more transitional and less transformational. For many blacks, the American Dream remains far too elusive. Thanks to the Bush years and the Great Recession, many African Americans are worse off economically than were their parents. The income gap between whites and blacks has GROWN in the last 30 years. Racial discrimination endures in education, wages and employment. Indeed, a class divide has developed in the black community: middle class African Americans say they share values more in common with middle-class whites than they do with the underclass of poor blacks and whites.

African Americans still represent Obama’s strongest base of support. Just as John F. Kennedy broke a social barrier in becoming the first Catholic president, Obama broke a social barrier in becoming the first African American president. Just as anti-Catholic bigotry dissolved into insignificance after the 1960 election, it seems likely that bigotry against African Americans will fade with the generations that lived in and perpetuated racial segregation.

But much work is left to be done — especially in the economic realm — in making Martin Luther King’s dream of racial equality a reality.


Steve Marsel Galleries Blog Guest Blogger Jim Buie

Jim Buie

Guest blogger Jim Buie grew up in a small town in North Carolina during the turmoil of the civil rights era, which pricked his conscience about the social injustices he observed locally. He went on to a six-year career as a newspaperman, where he profiled Klansmen, met Martin Luther King Sr., Andrew Young, and Rosa Parks, among other “greats” of the civil rights movement.

More recently he served as a communications consultant to the North Carolina NAACP.  Mr. Buie is teaching English in central Turkey where he also writes articles for international publications.  His most recent book “Teacher of ‘Our Town’,” Jim explores his mother’s experiences as a teacher during the racial integration of her public school she taught at. He blogs about civil rights and current events at www.jimbuie.com.  Read more about civil rights on his blog .

Visit Steve Marsel’s other sites: Steve Marsel Studio, the assignment site and flagship site of the Steve Marsel brand, Steve Marsel Stock, the rights managed digital stock library of Steve Marsel Studio, Steve Marsel Galleries, the private gallery site of the Steve Marsel Studio. Visit one of Boston Photographer Steve Marsel’s other blogs as well: Steve Marsel Studio Blog , the creative blog of the Steve Marsel Studio. Steve Marsel Galleries Blog, Steve Marsel’s blog that discusses the stories behind the photographs, and Steve Marsel Stock Blog, the blog of Steve Marsel’s rights managed digital stock photography library that discusses the stories behind the images on the stock site.

Actual text of the speech by Dr. Martin Luther King to kickoff the Montgomery Bus Boycott December 5th, 1955
We are here this evening for serious business. We are here in a general sense because first and foremost we are American citizens, and we are determined to apply our citizenship to the fullness of its means. We are here because of our love for democracy, because of our deep-seated belief that democracy transformed from thin paper to thick action is the greatest, form of government on earth. But we are here in a specific sense, because of the bus situation in Montgomery. We are here because we are determined to get the situation corrected.

This situation is not at all new. The problem has existed over endless years. For many years now Negroes in Montgomery and so many other areas have been inflicted with the paralysis of crippling fear on buses in our community. On so many occasions, Negroes have been intimidated and humiliated and oppressed because of the sheer fact that they were Negroes. I don’t have time this evening to go into the history of these numerous cases.But at least one stands before us now with glaring dimensions. Just the other day, just last Thursday to be exact, one of the finest citizens in Montgomery – not one of the finest Negro citizens but one of the finest citizens in Montgomery – was taken from a bus and carried to jail and arrested because she refused to get up to give her seat to a white person. Mrs. Rosa Parks is a fine person. And since it had to happen I’m happy it happened to a person like Mrs. Parks, for nobody can doubt the boundless outreach of her integrity. Nobody can doubt the height of her character, nobody can doubt the depth of her Christian commitment and devotion to the teachings of Jesus.And just because she refused to get up, she was arrested. You know my friends there comes a time when people get tired of being trampled over by the iron feet of oppression. There comes a time my friends when people get tired of being flung across the abyss of humiliation where they experience the bleakness of nagging despair. There comes a time when people get tired of being pushed out of the glittering sunlight of life’s July and left standing amidst the piercing chill of an Alpine November.

We are here, we are here this evening because we’re tired now. Now let us say that we are not here advocating violence. We have overcome that. I want it to be known throughout Montgomery and throughout this nation that we are Christian people. We believe in the Christian religion. We believe in the teachings of Jesus. The only weapon that we have in our hands this evening is the weapon of protest. And secondly, this is the glory of America, with all of its faults. This is the glory of our democracy. If we were incarcerated behind the iron curtains of a Communistic nation we couldn’t do this. If we were trapped in the dungeon of a totalitarian regime we couldn’t do this. But the great glory of American democracy is the right to protest for right.

My friends, don’t let anybody make us feel that we ought to be compared in our actions with the Ku Klux Klan or with the White Citizens’ Councils. There will be no crosses burned at any bus stops in Montgomery. There will be no white persons pulled out of their homes and taken out to some distant road and murdered.

There will be nobody among us who will stand up and defy the Constitution of this nation. We only assemble here because of our desire to see right exist.

My friends, I want it to be known that we’re going to work with grim and firm determination to gain justice on the buses in this city. And we are not wrong, we are not wrong in what we are doing. If we are wrong, then the Supreme Court of this Nation is wrong. If we are wrong, the Constitution of the United States is wrong. If we are wrong, God Almighty is wrong. If we are wrong, Jesus of Nazareth was merely a Utopian dreamer and never came down to earth. If we are wrong, justice is a lie. And we are determined here in Montgomery to work and fight until justice runs down like water and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I want to say that with all of our actions we must stick together. Unity is the great need of the hour. And if we are united, we can get many of the things that we not only desire but which we justly deserve. And don’t let anybody frighten you. We are not afraid of what we are doing, because we are doing it within the law.

There is never a time in our American democracy that we must ever think we’re wrong when we protest. We reserve that right. We, the disinherited of this land, we who have been oppressed so long are tired of going through the long night of captivity. And we are reaching out for the daybreak of freedom and justice and equality. In all of our doings, in all of our deliberations whatever we do, we must keep God in the forefront. Let us be Christian in all of our action. And I want to tell you this evening that it is not enough for us to talk about love. Love is one of the pinnacle parts of the Christian faith. There is another side called justice. And justice is really love in application. Justice is love correcting that which would work against love. Standing beside love is always justice. And we are only using the tools of justice. Not only are we using the tools of persuasion but we’ve got to use the tools of coercion. Not only is this thing a process of education but it is also a process of legislation.

And as we stand and sit here this evening, and as we prepare ourselves for what lies ahead, let us go out with a grim and bold determination that we are going to stick together. We are going to work together. Right here in Montgomery when the history books are written in the future, somebody will have to say “There lived a race of people, black people, fleecy locks and black complexion, of people who had the moral courage to stand up for their rights.” And thereby they injected a new meaning into the veins of history and of civilization. And we’re gonna do that. God grant that we will do it before it’s too late.

More info at http://www.thecorsetcenter.com/.

Your 2010 hangover is now officially over. Make 2011 your happy new year.

Friday, January 14th, 2011

Without even knowing that 2010 was the Year of the Tiger, I’m guessing that you will nod in agreement when I propose that we all need a warmer, fuzzier 2011.  That must be why it’s so pleasing to announce that next year will, in fact, be better—at least according to the Chinese zodiac. The Tiger of all hangover years—AKA, the year rife with cholera, oil spillage, and loudmouth tea partiers—will make way for the sweet, fluffy (preferably dwarf-angora-lop-eared ) Year of the Rabbit on February 3, 2011!

Original Photography by Boston Advertising & Commercial Photographer Steve Marsel

Photograph ©2011 Steve Marsel

So what should we all meditate on this year to make it a good one? Rest. Peace. Tranquility. The year proports to be languid and leisurely with a carefree and slightly indulgent air. Time to play nice and spoil each other. Do I smell gourmet cupcakes? Just don’t take it too far–procrastination will also loom. Railroad your diet, and that emergency bootcamp class will surely harsh the mellow.

Good taste, art, and culture will receive a bit more emphasis in 2011, as will personal development and slow, steady growth. Perhaps the most charming quality of the lucky rabbit year is that love, romance, and family life are well-starred. You will suddenly realize what it all means to you–how very lucky you are to have what you have and be surrounded by such amazing people, too.

While strife will still surround us—it can’t magically vanish, after all—the Rabbit favors peaceful solutions to life’s problems and much needed diplomacy. Last year may have left you feeling that all is lost, but chillax, hope is very much alive.

So enjoy yourself, entertain your friends, and take it easy! While you’re at it, have a coconut water – you probably need the electrolytes.

Lisa Miller

Guest blogger Lisa Miller was born in the Year of the Rat or the Jack Russell Terrier—she can’t remember. She is living and writing in enjoyable relative obscurity at the end of a driveway and the edge of a river. In true Rat fashion, as long as she doesn’t have to work in an office, Lisa will write anything you want at any time for money–anything.

Additional thanks go to the very talented Stylist Donna Laviolette Model – Amanda Wilson, and Retouching by James Eves Photography by Steve Marsel

Visit Steve Marsel’s other sites: Steve Marsel Studio, the assignment site and flagship site of the Steve Marsel brand, Steve Marsel Stock, the rights managed digital stock library of Steve Marsel Studio, Steve Marsel Galleries, the private gallery site of the Steve Marsel Studio. Visit one of Boston Photographer Steve Marsel’s other blogs as well: Steve Marsel Studio Blog , the creative blog of the Steve Marsel Studio. Steve Marsel Galleries Blog, Steve Marsel’s blog that discusses the stories behind the photographs, and Steve Marsel Stock Blog, the blog of Steve Marsel’s rights managed digital stock photography library that discusses the stories behind the images on the stock site.

 

The Edward W. Brooke Charter School – Changing the Future, One Child at a Time

Thursday, December 16th, 2010

Help Us Change the Course of More Students’ Futures  Photography by Boston Photographer Steve Marsel

Today he’s in second grade. But one day he’ll be grading papers.
Donate Now - Click to Donate

Every child deserves a great education. But across the country, schools are failing to educate low-income and minority students. At the Edward W. Brooke Charter School in Boston, our incredible teachers are actually closing the achievement gap.

Brooke scholars:

Ranked #1 in the state on both the 2010 7th grade Math Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) and the 2010 7th grade English Language Arts MCAS

Ranked #1 in the state on both the 2010 8th grade Math MCAS and the 2010 8th grade English Language Arts MCAS

Ranked #1 in Boston on both the 2010 4th grade Math MCAS and the 2010 4th grade English Language Arts MCAS

Consistently outperform students in wealthy suburbs like Wellesley, Lexington, and Brookline in both reading and math

Attend top high schools and colleges, including Boston Latin, Phillips Andover, and U. Mass-Amherst

Currently, there are more than 1,500 Boston Public School students on our wait list, most of whom lack access to high-quality education options. They need your support.

As you make your end of year contributions, we hope you’ll consider investing in our school. Our operational costs are completely covered by public dollars, so 100 percent of your tax-deductible donation will be used to create more academic opportunities for Boston students, through expanding our school size, and through scholarships to competitive high schools that keep students on the path to college.

We hope you’ll join us in supporting a better education for Boston students. If you’d like to learn more about our amazing teachers and scholars, please call us to set up a tour, or visit our website.

Sincerely,

Jon Clark
Co-Director and
Middle School Principal
Kimberly Steadman
Co-Director and
Elementary School Principal

Click here to Donate Now

“Abraham” Photograph ©2010 Steve Marsel, Concept/Copy By Deb Siegel, Design by Paul
Huber
Retouching by James Eves, HTML  Design by Lee Busch, Additional HTML coding
by Bill Langenberg

Visit Steve Marsel’s other sites: Steve Marsel Studio, the assignment site and flagship site of the Steve Marsel brand, Steve Marsel Stock, the rights managed digital stock library of Steve Marsel Studio, Steve Marsel Galleries, the private gallery site of the Steve Marsel Studio. Visit one of Boston Photographer Steve Marsel’s other blogs as well: Steve Marsel Studio Blog , the creative blog of the Steve Marsel Studio. Steve Marsel Galleries Blog, Steve Marsel’s blog that discusses the stories behind the photographs, and Steve Marsel Stock Blog, the blog of Steve Marsel’s rights managed digital stock photography library that discusses the stories behind the images on the stock site.

Deranged Chic Original Photography by Boston Photographer Steve Marsel

Thursday, November 25th, 2010

Kate Moss lead us toward Heroin Chic, Mary-Kate Olsen brought us Shabby Chic and the newest obsession du jour is Deranged Chic.  The idea is that if you can wear the soaring 5 inch Christian Louboutins (and can afford the soaring prices), then any night-time-show the paparazzi capture is tres chic. Therefore; Rehab is tres chic. House arrest is tres chic. Insane asylums, tres chic.  (continued below photo)

 

Original Photography by Boston Advertising & Commercial Photographer Steve Marse

Deranged Chic Photograph © Steve Marsel

What are we to think of a society that values {seemingly} fame and beauty over career achievement, responsibility, and family?  My leading ladies (Nicole Richie, LaLohan, Paris Hilton, and the comeback of the century… Britney Spears) were shipped off to jail, rehab, house arrest and mental institutions.  Of course, nobody of the contemporary generation feels that people these fabulous deserve to be on lock down of any sort.  They play their roles in the American Dream, walking the red carpet and entertaining the rest of us with their 4:00am photo shoots in cars with other celebutantes! Miley Cyrus is 18 this week…   Who else can’t wait to see what’s in store from the newest young thing??

C’est la vie..

Elyse Lightner

Guest blogger Elyse Lightner is a twenty something, candidate for a masters in art business at Sotheby’s Institute of Art in New York City. Her internship with Steve, worldly  travels and obsession with museums have lead her to pursue a life surrounded by art and all things beautiful.

Additional thanks go to the very talented Stylist Alicia Barrett, Styling assistant – Elyse Lightner, Model – Ashley A., Hair By Darren Le,  Make-up by Elizabeth Moon, and Retouching by Emily Scalici. Photography by Steve Marsel

Visit Steve Marsel’s other sites: Steve Marsel Studio, the assignment site and flagship site of the Steve Marsel brand, Steve Marsel Stock, the rights managed digital stock library of Steve Marsel Studio, Steve Marsel Galleries, the private gallery site of the Steve Marsel Studio. Visit one of Boston Photographer Steve Marsel’s other blogs as well: Steve Marsel Studio Blog , the creative blog of the Steve Marsel Studio. Steve Marsel Galleries Blog, Steve Marsel’s blog that discusses the stories behind the photographs, and Steve Marsel Stock Blog, the blog of Steve Marsel’s rights managed digital stock photography library that discusses the stories behind the images on the stock site. As a end note, see these best generators for the money in our lastest review here.