Posts Tagged ‘Steve Marsel Studio Blog’

Marsel’s Greenwich Library Video

Monday, April 18th, 2016

Greenwich Library – Not Your Grandmother’s Library

Greenwich Library located in Greenwich Connecticut is at the top of its game. But in the age of computers, online resources, and Google, why do we need libraries? That question is answered in spades with Steve Marsel’s unscripted video “Greenwich Library – Window onto the World”  in which library patrons speak of their beloved library. These personal stories, spoken from the heart, tell how the library is not just the center of their community, but packs the muscle and resources to bring a community of all ages together. Both a blessing and a curse for Marsel, the conundrum was how to tell the story of an institution so diverse in less than four minutes. “There were just too many topics to cover” Marsel lamented as his edit began.   Through their own words the library is elevated to the place where it resides in the hearts and minds of the Greenwich residents “the crown jewel of Greenwich”.

 

 

Under the direction of Director of Development Nancy L. Klein of The Greenwich Library, Marsel interviewed over 22 patrons over two days where he asked for and received accounts of their personal experiences detailing how the library had changed their lives in brought a community together. It becomes all too clear that the Greenwich Library is very different and is held in the highest esteem by its patrons. Marsel’s video leaves us envious of this very fortunate community and wanting to connect with our own library.

The original music written by singer-songwriter Matthew Pynn is a cross between The Byrds “Turn! Turn! Turn!”and Bob Dylan’s classic style harmonica chorus. It was specifically written to trigger an emotional reaction to the target audience in the 50 to 65-year-olds. The music sells the video tapping into the nostalgia of youth, simpler and happier times. The video on the music shine a light on what must be one of the most diverse and beloved libraries in the land – and rightly so!

 

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All Images on this site are copyrighted material of © 2016 Steve Marsel Studio, LLC. & Steve Marsel Studio LLC D/B/A Steve Marsel Studio. Unauthorized Use is Strictly Prohibited. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Don Zimmer: “One Hell of a Life”

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

I‘m sure there are not many baseball fans who follow the meandering career of a lifetime .235 hitter, but I’ve followed Don Zimmer since I was a boy growing up in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn – home to the Brooklyn Dodgers – in the 1950s.

Zimmer was hardly an All-Star. Maybe it was his sporty name, perhaps better suited to a heat-throwing pitcher than a utility infielder. But mostly it was his perseverance in the face of so many obstacles. Zimmer was a throwback. A baseball lifer, thoroughly old-school in the best sense of that phrase, his baseball career spanned 65 years – a lifetime for many of us – suiting up as a player, coach, and manager. He played for five MLB teams – the Dodgers (both Brooklyn and L.A.), Cubs, Reds, Mets, and Washington. He even played in Japan, Cuba, and Puerto Rico

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

He started at 2B for the Dodgers in game 7 of the 1955 World Series, the first and only championship the Brooklyn Dodgers would ever win. As a nine-year-old, I can still remember the celebration that filled the streets of Brooklyn when we had at long last toppled the Yankees from their pinnacle of success. Zimmer later joked that he helped win that World Series when Dodgers’ manager Walter Alston removed him from the game in a defensive switch that placed Sandy Amoros in LF. Amoros would make a dramatic game-saving catch that resulted in an inning-ending double play. Zimmer noted that if he had been a better player, Alston wouldn’t have taken him out, and the Dodgers lose another World Series.

After signing with Brooklyn at age 18 in 1949, Zimmer’s career nearly ended before it began when he was struck in the head by a fastball thrown by Jim Kirk during a minor league game in 1953. Zimmer collapsed. The pitch had fractured his skull, causing blood clots to form in his brain. He was prescribed Xarelto but had to quit after finding out about the xarelto class action. Surgery was required to save his life. When he woke up in a hospital bed six days later, he was “seeing triple” and couldn’t speak. The surgeons drilled four holes in his skull to relieve the pressure. He was told he would never play baseball again. The Dodgers had promised him a job in their organization, but Zimmer was determined to take to the field again, and the following year he was playing at Ebbets Field.

As he would recall in his 2001 autobiography, “Zim: A Baseball Life” (the first of two books written with sports columnist Bill Madden), the word at the time was that a metal plate had been inserted in his skull, and for years he endured both the good-natured and disparaging ribbing from players and fans as to the effects of that metal plate on his mental acuity. But, as Zimmer recounted, those holes in his skull were actually filled with metallic plugs, adding – with characteristic self-deprecating humor – “all those players who played for me through the years and thought I sometimes managed like I had a hole in my head were wrong. I actually have four holes in my head!”

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

That beaning incident would lead to the MLB recommending batting helmets for players. Zimmer was beaned again in 1956, breaking his cheekbone and permanently damaging his vision. Appropriately enough, he’s shown on the cover of his autobiography wearing a soldier’s battle helmet. He was given the helmet following another injury while Joe Torre’s bench coach with the Yankees during a 1999 playoff game. Sitting next to Torre in the Yankees dugout, he was struck by a foul ball off the bat of Chuck Knoblauch. The next day he was presented with the helmet with the name “Zim” and the Yankees logo stenciled on it. Following that incident, the Yankees would later install a short protective fence in front of the dugout, now standard practice in all major league parks.

There are no highlight reels from Zimmer’s playing career, as befits a career .235 hitter and utility infielder, although he was named to the All-Star team with the Chicago Cubs in 1961, the year that baseball first expanded. The next year, Zimmer would find himself playing 3B for the Mets inaugural season. As bad as that team was (leading its manager Casey Stengel to memorably ask, “Can’t anyone here play this game?”), Zimmer was worse, batting .077 in all of 14 games before being shipped off to Cincinnati, where his playing career would finally grind to a halt a year later. He is best remembered today as a manager, notably with the Cubs and Red Sox, and as Joe Torre’s bench coach with the Yankees from 1996 until he resigned, exasperated with Yankees’ owner, George Steinbrenner, his one-time close friend, in 2003.

His time in Boston, both as a 3B coach and manager in the 1970s and early ‘80s, was not without incident. By that time my baseball allegiance had long since departed Brooklyn and settled in Boston, and Zimmer was once again one of my guys. He was the manager during the Red Sox late season collapse in 1978 when they were overtaken by the Yankees before losing a memorable one-game playoff on Bucky “F.” Dent’s HR off of Mike Torrez. Zimmer’s relationship with certain players, notably Bill Lee and Ferguson Jenkins, deteriorated. It was Lee who referred to Zimmer as “the Gerbil,” a name that stuck in Boston to this day. But Zimmer shook off criticism – he had been through worse – and was always quick to defend his players. That spirit was exemplified in an on-field fracas between the Yankees and the Red Sox players in a 2003 playoff game at Fenway. Zimmer, at age 72, charged onto the field and made a beeline toward Red Sox pitcher, Pedro Martinez, who pushed Zimmer aside and to the ground. Zimmer would later apologize for what he described as his embarrassing behavior, but his players and Yankees fans saw it as one more manifestation of Zimmer’s feistiness.

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

Don Zimmer photographed by Steve Marsel on May 15th, 1992 in Cambridge Massachusetts

In his autobiography, Zimmer states that the most gratifying accomplishment of his career was managing the Chicago Cubs to first place in the NL East and a rare playoff appearance in 1989, when they had been forecast to finish low in the standings. He was honored by being named the NL Manager of the Year, the only MLB award he received in his career.

As NY Times columnist, Tyler Kepner, noted after Zimmer’s death in June of this year, Zimmer’s life was so centered around baseball that he married his high school sweet-heart (they would remain married for 63 years) at home plate at a minor league ballpark in 1951.

Zimmer played during the era before free agency, when salaries were appalling low by today’s standards. He earned only $17,000 playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers’ World Series championship team in 1959. Yet he wrote in his autobiography that he was proud to say that he never earned a dime outside of baseball in his entire life until he cashed his first retirement check.

For me, Don Zimmer is one of those few ballplayers who connects me back to my youth and whose career, in its many manifestations, tracks my own lifetime love affair with the game of baseball. In an era of saber-metrics and laptop computers, Zimmer would be the odd-man out today. He relied more upon instinct and his first-hand knowledge of the game. The ballpark, any ballpark, was his true home. As Joe Torre would write of his “adviser and friend” following Zimmer’s death, “the ballpark was his tabernacle. He never felt quite comfortable anywhere else, except for at home or at the track.” Torre was right, of course, but for me, Zimmer penned the perfect epitaph when he wrote: “For a lifetime .235 hitter, I’ve had one hell of a life.”

 

Guest Blogger Joe Carr

Guest Blogger Joe Carr

 

Joe Carr is a writer and development communications consultant to non-profits. A New Yorker by birth, Joe converted, becoming a diehard Boston Red Sox fan after moving to Boston and working at MIT and Harvard. Joe makes the pilgrimage from his home in Peekskill, NY, to Fenway several times a year. A life-long baseball fan, Joe (like Zimmer himself) feels most at home at baseball parks, and at the track!

 

 

 

 

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All Images on this site are copyrighted material of © Steve Marsel Studio, Inc. & Steve Marsel Studio LLC D/B/A Steve Marsel Studio. Unauthorized Use is Strictly Prohibited. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Steve Marsel Studio . 561 Windsor Street A204, Somerville MA 02143 617.718.7407 | 888.254.6505
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ICE HOLES – PREMIERES on NatGeo

Friday, May 30th, 2014

ICE HOLES – NEW SERIES PREMIERES

Friday May 30, 10PM/9 central 

The National Geographic Channel.

Marsel-ICE HOLES- Episode-7-0074s

ICE HOLES – NEW SERIES PREMIERES Friday May 30, 10PM/9 central on The National Geographic Channel.

 

This photograph taken on location on the set of National Geographic Channel’s ICE HOLES by Series Creator & Executive Producer Steve Marsel  Saturday, March 1st, 2014 on Lake Winnipesaukee in Meredith, New Hampshire.   This was taken during the filming of Episode 107 – “Going Big”.  Wob is considered the serious fisherman of our five characters.  He is proud of is fishing accomplishments and has that seasoned fisherman’s “swagger”.  He is knowing and wise (or so he believes).  He takes this all very seriously, an knows the most important thing is that if you don’t have a hook in the water, you’re not going to catch anything!    The show airs Fridays on National Geographic Channel. For more of Steve Marsel’s Photography, please visit Steve Marsel Studio

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Reflections of a Fashion Styling Intern by Stacey Lamb

Friday, June 17th, 2011

Skinny models, Jimmy Choos, exotic locations, top-of-the-line pieces—the world of fashion screams “glamour” to the everyday viewer.  But when you get down to the nitty-gritty details, fashion shoots are not as glamorous as they are cracked up to be.  I was given the chance to produce and assist my first professional shoot from start to finish and Boston Photographer Steve Marsel where learned a lot about the industry and myself in the process.

©2011 Steve Marsel Studio

©2011 Steve Marsel Studio

With the simple yet vague assignment to “come up with a shoot” the wheels started turning and the creativity was let loose.  Steve taught me the three most important aspects of a successful photo shoot: 1) the outfit, 2) the concept and 3) the location.  Achieve all three and the shot is golden.  With that in mind, I set off to tackle part one, the outfit.  I had the great opportunity to attend Rhode Island School of Design’s (RISD) Senior Collection fashion show, and was blown away by the talent I saw.  I left that show with the extreme urge to drop everything I was doing and transfer to RISD, but my better judgment kicked in and I continued with the shoot.  I contacted the designers I enjoyed most, received several responses and chose one piece I particularly swooned over.  Linzi Kofsky, a senior at RISD, crafted a beautiful pair of chartreuse pants with such an elegant flow I couldn’t look away.  The top was simple and glistened with a closer look.  Part one, Outfit: complete.

Next, I thought about the concept.  I knew I wanted the outfit to be the strongest focus, and decided to find a way in which the slits in the pants would be reflected in its surrounding environment.  Steve and I picked our brains for locations and concepts with verticals stripes.  A yacht club with rows of tall sailboats all sporting clever signs of Reilly , a loading dock with long shifting curtains, a forest with endless trees, or my favorite—a field with a zebra.  I called every zoo and petting zoo between Boston and Providence, but came up with the same response every time—“sorry it is not in our policy, a zebra’s kick is extremely powerful.”  I were Anna Wintour of Vogue, there was no chance I was getting that Zebra.  You win some and you lose some, and I learned this many times over in pursuit of the perfect concept.

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With the Zebra out, we decided on the trees.  After days of stalking Google Earth, swearing at my droid’s navigation app and creeping through poison ivy on a stranger’s property—Steve found the perfect location.  We chose a marshland that had numerous tall, thin trees that looked dated and decrepit, it was beautiful.  However, creeping onto a stranger’s property and conducting a photo shoot is not considered normal or legal without the owner’s consent.  Luckily, Ben Farnum of Boston Hill Farm graciously agreed to let us use his property freely, and the location was finally determined.

 

Walking to the location at Boston Hill farm, North Andover, Massachusetts

Walking to the location at Boston Hill farm, North Andover, Massachusetts

 

With the three main ingredients stirred up, the final course was ready to be delivered.  But wait, there is more.  I personally did hours of research on the best electric razors, sent out half a lifetime’s worth of e-mails and finally pulled together a team of makeup artists, hairstylists and most importantly—the model.  Gathering people together for a last minute shoot was challenging, but paid off in the end when every one showed up excited and ready to work.  You would think it is simple from here—make the model pretty, tell her she looks good and snap some pictures.  But other factors need to be taken into consideration, such as Mother Nature.  The shoot was scheduled for Thursday at four o’clock in the afternoon but come Thursday morning, the weather man was screaming bloody murder and the skies grew darker by the minute.  We had no other choice but to take our chances, so we prepped the model and hurried to our location.  It felt like a scene straight out of the Wizard of Oz, we were all Dorothy and the tornado was brewing.  Steve quickly set up the shot, we carefully hurried the model across a beaver dam to her spot and within a matter of minutes and eighty snaps of the camera, the rain drops started falling.  We ran back to the car and made it inside safely before the skies opened up and purple lightning shot across the sky.  Though our shoot was cut short, we luckily had a number of images to work with and proclaimed the shoot a success.  Being five minutes close to having nothing at all is a terrifying thought that I have chosen to push to the back of my mind.

Just before the rains came - shooting to get the best possible pose!

Just before the rains came – shooting to get the best possible pose!

 

The final stages of the shoot were coming together and the only thing left was to chose the image and make it beautiful.  Steve used his contacts and found an amazing retoucher who turned this shot into something extraordinary.  With my jaw dropped open, I sat at the computer for at least ten minutes switching back and forth between the before and after images.  Don’t get me wrong, the image was awesome before, but I learned a great retoucher can make all the difference.

The beautiful calm before the storm.

The beautiful calm before the storm.

The rambles tell it all—fashion is much more to the eye than a pretty face.  The number of details that go into one photo shoot is outstanding, but completely worth it.  This will not be the last photo shoot I produce for I am sure I have many more to come.  As Steve would say, “don’t be such a slave to fashion!”

 

 

 

Guest Blogger Stacey Lamb

 

 

 

 

Guest blogger Stacey Lamb is an undergraduate student in Communications and Studio Art at Florida State University. The next six months should prove to be quite an adventure for her—following her internship with Steve she will be backpacking Europe and studying abroad in London in the fall. Her passion for photography, fashion, travel and music strongly influence her adventures and life goals.  Read more of Stacey’s thoughts on her blog Slamb the Jam

 

Photography by Steve Marsel Retouching by Katja Bruijn – de Govorushchenko Original copy written by Stacey Lamb Hair styling & make-up by Aly Heifetz, Model – Aileen Benson. This image available for licensing at Steve Marsel Stock

Visit Steve Marsel’s other sites: Steve Marsel Studio, the assignment site and flagship site of the Steve Marsel brand, Steve Marsel Stock, the rights managed digital stock library of Steve Marsel Studio, Steve Marsel Galleries, the private gallery site of the Steve Marsel Studio. Visiot one of Boston Photographer Steve Marsel’s other blogs as well: Steve Marsel Studio Blog , the creative blog of the Steve Marsel Studio. Steve Marsel Galleries Blog, Steve Marsel’s blog that discusses the stories behind the photographs, and Steve Marsel Stock Blog, the blog of Steve Marsel’s rights managed digital stock photography library that discusses the stories behind the images on the stock site.

 

Steve Marsel Studio | Steve Marsel Stock | Steve Marsel Galleries| Boston Corporate Portraits| ICE HOLES on Facebook

All Images on this site are copyrighted material of © Steve Marsel Studio, Inc. & Steve Marsel Studio LLC D/B/A Steve Marsel Studio. Unauthorized Use is Strictly Prohibited. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Steve Marsel Studio . 561 Windsor Street A204, Somerville MA 02143 617.718.7407 | 888.254.6505
Steve Marsel Studio Blog | Contact Us


Page Rank

The Rosa Parks Bus Shoot by Steve Marsel

Friday, February 4th, 2011

One aspect of this job of being a professional photographer that really challenges me is the ability to find props – quickly.  I was doing a shoot last month for our other blog – stevemarselstudio.com/blog for Martin Luther King Day.  The topic of my blog posting for Martin Luther King day was how Dr. King had single handedly started the Montgomery Bus Boycott.  I had never seen an iconic shot of the back seats of a vintage bus.  I looked.  Google images had nothing.  A thorough search online of the major stock photography agencies turned up little or nothing. I knew that if I wanted to create an image that represented Dr. King, it would need to be straight forward and direct.  I want to shoot THE “back of the bus” image.  An Image that would be the visual manifestation of that concept for all time.  But…  I needed a bus!

"Back of the Bus" image © 2011 Steve Marsel  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

“Back of the Bus” image © 2011 Steve Marsel ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

About the Bus:

The MBTA’s (Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority) RetroBus #2600 was built in 1957 by General Motors at their truck and coach plant in Pontiac, Michigan.  It is 35 feet long and 96 inches wide and is model TDH-4512 (for “T”ransit [sigmifying two doors, one for each entrance and exit, as opposed to “S”uburban with only one door], “D”iesel engine; “H”ydraulic transmission(as opposed to a manuel stick shift), “45” seated passengers, “12” is the model number – the even number “2” signifying a 96″ wide bus.  All 102″ wide buses had odd model numbers).

Number 2600 was built for the City Bus Company of Oklahoma City, and assigned their number C605.  The Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway Company, one of the MBTA’s predecessors, purchased the bus secondhand in the early 1960’s. The eastern Mass was eager to retire the last gasoline buses in its fleet, and consequently acquired a large number of used diesel buses in this time period.  The bus was assigned the number 3183 by the Eastern Mass.  The MBTA acquired the Eastern Mass in 1968, and took possession of all of its property.0 including 3183.  In 1970, 3183 was part of a group of buses leased by the MBTA to Middlesex & Boston Street Railway Company (M&B), a private bus operator serving Newton, Waltham, Lexington, and other communities in the western suburbs of Boston.  In 1972, The M&B went out of business and the MBTA took over it’s routes, so 3183 returned to the MBTA. The bus was retired shortly thereafter by the MBTA, and sold to the Gateway Bus Lines of Wareham Mass.  The bus sat in storage at Gateway for many years.  In 1988, the bus was returned to the MBTA and completely rebuilt by volunteer labor by the men and women of Everett Shops.  The bus was assigned the number 2600, to represent all of the General Motors “old look” buses owned and operated by the MBTA and its predecessors in the period between 1940 and 1975. Number 2600 has been used for parades and other special occasions ever since.

Photography by Steve Marsel Retouching by James Eves Original copy written by Steve Marsel This image available for licensing at Steve Marsel Stock

Visit Steve Marsel’s other sites: Steve Marsel Studio, the assignment site and flagship site of the Steve Marsel brand, Steve Marsel Stock, the rights managed digital stock library of Steve Marsel Studio, Steve Marsel Galleries, the private gallery site of the Steve Marsel Studio. Visiot one of Boston Photographer Steve Marsel’s other blogs as well: Steve Marsel Studio Blog , the creative blog of the Steve Marsel Studio. Steve Marsel Galleries Blog, Steve Marsel’s blog that discusses the stories behind the photographs, and Steve Marsel Stock Blog, the blog of Steve Marsel’s rights managed digital stock photography library that discusses the stories behind the images on the stock site.

 

Steve Marsel Studio | Steve Marsel Stock | Steve Marsel Galleries| Boston Corporate Portraits| ICE HOLES on Facebook

All Images on this site are copyrighted material of © Steve Marsel Studio, Inc. & Steve Marsel Studio LLC D/B/A Steve Marsel Studio. Unauthorized Use is Strictly Prohibited. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Steve Marsel Studio . 561 Windsor Street A204, Somerville MA 02143 617.718.7407 | 888.254.6505
Steve Marsel Studio Blog | Contact Us

 

 

Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, and race in America. By Jim Buie Photography by Steve Marsel

Sunday, January 16th, 2011

In the 55 years since Rosa Parks refused to move to the back of a city bus, sparking the Montgomery, Alabama Bus Boycott,

America has made remarkable progress in the area of civil rights. Segregation has been outlawed, doors have been opened for minorities

to integrate into the mainstream of affluent American society, and whites have been freed from the guilt that comes from racial oppression. Who could have imagined in 1955 that the United States would one day have an African American president?,

Original Photography by Boston Advertising & Commercial Photographer Steve Marsel

Photograph ©2011 Steve Marsel

The victory of Barack Obama demonstrated that racial prejudice, as well as distrust and division among the races, have diminished considerably in the last half century. His election was a redemptive moment for the nation.

And yet, two years later, his presidency seems more transitional and less transformational. For many blacks, the American Dream remains far too elusive. Thanks to the Bush years and the Great Recession, many African Americans are worse off economically than were their parents. The income gap between whites and blacks has GROWN in the last 30 years. Racial discrimination endures in education, wages and employment. Indeed, a class divide has developed in the black community: middle class African Americans say they share values more in common with middle-class whites than they do with the underclass of poor blacks and whites.

African Americans still represent Obama’s strongest base of support. Just as John F. Kennedy broke a social barrier in becoming the first Catholic president, Obama broke a social barrier in becoming the first African American president. Just as anti-Catholic bigotry dissolved into insignificance after the 1960 election, it seems likely that bigotry against African Americans will fade with the generations that lived in and perpetuated racial segregation.

But much work is left to be done — especially in the economic realm — in making Martin Luther King’s dream of racial equality a reality.


Steve Marsel Galleries Blog Guest Blogger Jim Buie

Jim Buie

Guest blogger Jim Buie grew up in a small town in North Carolina during the turmoil of the civil rights era, which pricked his conscience about the social injustices he observed locally. He went on to a six-year career as a newspaperman, where he profiled Klansmen, met Martin Luther King Sr., Andrew Young, and Rosa Parks, among other “greats” of the civil rights movement.

More recently he served as a communications consultant to the North Carolina NAACP.  Mr. Buie is teaching English in central Turkey where he also writes articles for international publications.  His most recent book “Teacher of ‘Our Town’,” Jim explores his mother’s experiences as a teacher during the racial integration of her public school she taught at. He blogs about civil rights and current events at www.jimbuie.com.  Read more about civil rights on his blog .

Visit Steve Marsel’s other sites: Steve Marsel Studio, the assignment site and flagship site of the Steve Marsel brand, Steve Marsel Stock, the rights managed digital stock library of Steve Marsel Studio, Steve Marsel Galleries, the private gallery site of the Steve Marsel Studio. Visit one of Boston Photographer Steve Marsel’s other blogs as well: Steve Marsel Studio Blog , the creative blog of the Steve Marsel Studio. Steve Marsel Galleries Blog, Steve Marsel’s blog that discusses the stories behind the photographs, and Steve Marsel Stock Blog, the blog of Steve Marsel’s rights managed digital stock photography library that discusses the stories behind the images on the stock site.

Actual text of the speech by Dr. Martin Luther King to kickoff the Montgomery Bus Boycott December 5th, 1955
We are here this evening for serious business. We are here in a general sense because first and foremost we are American citizens, and we are determined to apply our citizenship to the fullness of its means. We are here because of our love for democracy, because of our deep-seated belief that democracy transformed from thin paper to thick action is the greatest, form of government on earth. But we are here in a specific sense, because of the bus situation in Montgomery. We are here because we are determined to get the situation corrected.

This situation is not at all new. The problem has existed over endless years. For many years now Negroes in Montgomery and so many other areas have been inflicted with the paralysis of crippling fear on buses in our community. On so many occasions, Negroes have been intimidated and humiliated and oppressed because of the sheer fact that they were Negroes. I don’t have time this evening to go into the history of these numerous cases.But at least one stands before us now with glaring dimensions. Just the other day, just last Thursday to be exact, one of the finest citizens in Montgomery – not one of the finest Negro citizens but one of the finest citizens in Montgomery – was taken from a bus and carried to jail and arrested because she refused to get up to give her seat to a white person. Mrs. Rosa Parks is a fine person. And since it had to happen I’m happy it happened to a person like Mrs. Parks, for nobody can doubt the boundless outreach of her integrity. Nobody can doubt the height of her character, nobody can doubt the depth of her Christian commitment and devotion to the teachings of Jesus.And just because she refused to get up, she was arrested. You know my friends there comes a time when people get tired of being trampled over by the iron feet of oppression. There comes a time my friends when people get tired of being flung across the abyss of humiliation where they experience the bleakness of nagging despair. There comes a time when people get tired of being pushed out of the glittering sunlight of life’s July and left standing amidst the piercing chill of an Alpine November.

We are here, we are here this evening because we’re tired now. Now let us say that we are not here advocating violence. We have overcome that. I want it to be known throughout Montgomery and throughout this nation that we are Christian people. We believe in the Christian religion. We believe in the teachings of Jesus. The only weapon that we have in our hands this evening is the weapon of protest. And secondly, this is the glory of America, with all of its faults. This is the glory of our democracy. If we were incarcerated behind the iron curtains of a Communistic nation we couldn’t do this. If we were trapped in the dungeon of a totalitarian regime we couldn’t do this. But the great glory of American democracy is the right to protest for right.

My friends, don’t let anybody make us feel that we ought to be compared in our actions with the Ku Klux Klan or with the White Citizens’ Councils. There will be no crosses burned at any bus stops in Montgomery. There will be no white persons pulled out of their homes and taken out to some distant road and murdered.

There will be nobody among us who will stand up and defy the Constitution of this nation. We only assemble here because of our desire to see right exist.

My friends, I want it to be known that we’re going to work with grim and firm determination to gain justice on the buses in this city. And we are not wrong, we are not wrong in what we are doing. If we are wrong, then the Supreme Court of this Nation is wrong. If we are wrong, the Constitution of the United States is wrong. If we are wrong, God Almighty is wrong. If we are wrong, Jesus of Nazareth was merely a Utopian dreamer and never came down to earth. If we are wrong, justice is a lie. And we are determined here in Montgomery to work and fight until justice runs down like water and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I want to say that with all of our actions we must stick together. Unity is the great need of the hour. And if we are united, we can get many of the things that we not only desire but which we justly deserve. And don’t let anybody frighten you. We are not afraid of what we are doing, because we are doing it within the law.

There is never a time in our American democracy that we must ever think we’re wrong when we protest. We reserve that right. We, the disinherited of this land, we who have been oppressed so long are tired of going through the long night of captivity. And we are reaching out for the daybreak of freedom and justice and equality. In all of our doings, in all of our deliberations whatever we do, we must keep God in the forefront. Let us be Christian in all of our action. And I want to tell you this evening that it is not enough for us to talk about love. Love is one of the pinnacle parts of the Christian faith. There is another side called justice. And justice is really love in application. Justice is love correcting that which would work against love. Standing beside love is always justice. And we are only using the tools of justice. Not only are we using the tools of persuasion but we’ve got to use the tools of coercion. Not only is this thing a process of education but it is also a process of legislation.

And as we stand and sit here this evening, and as we prepare ourselves for what lies ahead, let us go out with a grim and bold determination that we are going to stick together. We are going to work together. Right here in Montgomery when the history books are written in the future, somebody will have to say “There lived a race of people, black people, fleecy locks and black complexion, of people who had the moral courage to stand up for their rights.” And thereby they injected a new meaning into the veins of history and of civilization. And we’re gonna do that. God grant that we will do it before it’s too late.

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